If staying productive yourself is a challenge, what about the productivity of your entire team?

In addition to managing all types of temperaments, you also need to discover what motivates each member of your team. You need to be able to align their goals with yours. Not always an easy task.

Being productive and being liked don’t have to be contradictory. It’s not impossible to have your team admire you, and still get things done. You don’t have to stand on your desk and shout orders or be an overbearing Gordon Gekko alpha-type.

Give these 5 productivity “hacks” a shot and your team won’t just love you, you’ll get their best on a daily basis.

1. Set clear priorities, goals, and expectations.

Every single member of your team should know exactly what their assigned tasks are. In addition, they should have a clear understanding of the priority of those tasks and what’s expected of them.

You don’t want them working on a low priority task (that could have been done later) before taking care of more important tasks. But you can’t very well blame the employee if they weren’t aware of these priority levels.

So whether a Trello board or old fashion sticky notes work best for you and your team, just be sure to clearly outline what needs to happen.

2. Give your team ownership.

Every single member of your team should know exactly what their assigned tasks are. In addition, they should have a clear understanding of the priority of those tasks and what’s expected of them.

You don’t want them working on a low priority task (that could have been done later) before taking care of more important tasks. But you can’t very well blame the employee if they weren’t aware of these priority levels.

So whether a Trello board or old fashion sticky notes work best for you and your team, just be sure to clearly outline what needs to happen.

3. Involve the team in decision making.

First things first, get rid of the “my way or the highway” mentality. Your team is the heart of your business. They deal with customers on a daily basis and know the company’s internal processes front and back.

It’s highly possible they know more about your customers than you do. They hear exactly what the customers think of your products and services so undoubtedly they’ll have opinions and ideas on many facets of the business and its processes.

Why would you not want to hear those ideas and implement them to improve what you’re already doing?

4. Know their strengths and weaknesses.

Everyone has hidden talents. Take some time to learn your team’s talents and you’ll find opportunities to put those skills to use. Who likes to do what? What does no one like to do?

If a member of the team likes writing, ask if they’d be interested in writing some fresh content for your website and social channels. Have an aspiring photographer on board? Maybe they could help with some new visuals. The advantage of this is two-fold. Not only does it help the company, it lets the team put their talents and passion to work and in return they feel important and empowered.

Just don’t require extra work from team members that are already swamped. More work doesn’t equal productivity.

At the same time, it’s helpful to be aware of weaknesses. If someone isn’t great with math, don’t give them accounting duties. In addition to not having the necessary skills to do the job right, if they struggle with the task they’ll be less motivated to do it in the first place.

5. Consider your meeting schedule.

Meetings can be a huge waste of time. That’s why your team hates them. They’d rather be working on something productive than sitting in a pointless meeting for an hour. Want to build a little camaraderie? Do something fun for a meeting or at least bring that tea that everyone likes. On average, we waste four hours every week on unproductive meetings.

The sad truth is everyone has to endure meetings. Just make them as painless as possible.

Some meetings are quite necessary for productivity though. Just prepare and plan for your next one. Make sure you’re not meeting all afternoon about something that could have been said easily in an email or Slack. When you do need to have a meeting, write up a succinct agenda and send it to the team so they can prepare.